The History of Telecommunication

Remember that thing you saw on Lord of The Rings Return of The King? you know the part where all the kingdoms are informed that it’s time to slay the Orcs, That my friends, is how our ancestors communicated in the past, as we all know, assume or science tells us we all originated from Africa.

Back then our ancestors had no phones or the internet. Thus they used drums and smoke signals to send “goodnight, I love you” texts to their sweethearts. No just kidding these signals were used to send important messages such as we are going to beat up those guys over there today and take their women or to call for help.

Forward a few centuries into the future and humanity has spread out all over the planet, even Columbus has already gone on his tour of the world and brought back syphilis to his people. We are in the 1790s. We can say that this was when it all changed.

Somewhere in Europe the first semaphore system emerged, created by a French engineer with a similarly French name Claude Chappe the semaphore system or the visual telegraph was a system of sending messages by holding the arms of two poles or flags in certain positions according to an alphabetical code.

When we all got tired of doing that an engineer from Sweden came up with a system that relied upon shutters, the only problem was this system required experts kind of like that guy who fixes your cable to operate. That’s why it was abandoned in 1880.

Humanity gets smarter

In 1884 some guy named Samuel Morse‘s invented what we now know as the Telegraph, this technology was adapted by the US post office and used unchallenged for three years, they even built the pioneering Washington to Baltimore line. Seeing opportunity in this, money hungry private companies joined in and connected New York to Philadelphia.

In 1858 an American company laid the first cable that connected the United state to Britain, it worked for a few months, but then it failed. Success was … Read the rest

The Pros and Cons of VOIP

All things considered, I think it safe to assume that at the end of every single day all we want to do is save money, why? It is a scarce resource that we all need. VOIP is an acronym that stands for Voice over Internet Protocol. This refers to a category of hardware and software that helps you to use the internet as a medium for phone calls.

Simply put, you use it to send voice messages via the internet and it saves you money when compared to traditional means.

The Advantages of VOIP

Saves You Money 

As hinted at above one of the biggest advantage you get from VOIP is it saves you money, how?  Companies that offer VOIP broadband services charge lower fees when compared to traditional options. Take Skype for instance; with Skype you can make local or international calls for very little money.

If you call someone who let’s say is in Antarctica multiple times through normal means, you can imagine the nature of your phone bill at the end of the month.

Sometimes it’s Free

Sticking with Skype (VOIP service provider) you can make free PC to PC calls to anyone anywhere on the planet, however, you will be charged for PC to phone calls and vice versa.

You also have the option to buy unlimited calls within a specified geographical area.

You Can Use it Anywhere

As long as you have a broadband connection or a device that lets you access VOIP services, you can use it anywhere you like. All you need is a laptop tablet or even your phone; this means that you can enjoy cheap calling rates anywhere on the planet.

Allows You to ‘Cheat’ the System

Assume that you are in Vancouver and you move to Toronto, some VOIP service providers e.g. Skype give you the option to buy a number in Vancouver or anywhere else of your choosing. This makes it cheaper for you to keep in contact with people you know in Vancouver.

Another advantage is you can call and message at the same time.

The Disadvantages of Read the rest

The History of Telecommunication

Remember that thing you saw on Lord of The Rings Return of The King? you know the part where all the kingdoms are informed that it’s time to slay the Orcs, That my friends, is how our ancestors communicated in the past, as we all know, assume or science tells us we all originated from Africa.

Back then our ancestors had no phones or the internet, thus they used drums and smoke signals to send “goodnight, I love you” texts to their sweethearts. No just kidding these signals were used to send important messages such as we are going to beat up those guys over there today and take their women or to call for help.

Forward a few centuries into the future and humanity has spread out all over the planet, even Columbus has already gone on his tour of the world and brought back syphilis to his people. We are in the 1790s. We can say that this is when it all changed.

Somewhere in Europe the first semaphore system emerged, created by a French engineer with a similarly French name Claude Chappe the semaphore system or the visual telegraph was a system of sending messages by holding the arms of two poles or flags in certain positions according to an alphabetical code.

When we all got tired of doing that an engineer from Sweden came up with a system that relied upon shutters, the only problem was this system required experts kind of like that guy who fixes your cable to operate. That’s why it was abandoned in 1880.

Humanity Gets Smarter

In 1884 some guy named Samuel Morse‘s invented what we now know as the telegraph, this technology was adapted by the US post office and used unchallenged for 3 years, they even built the pioneering Washington to Baltimore line. Seeing opportunity in this, money hungry private companies joined in and connected New York to Philadelphia.

In 1858 an American company laid the first cable that connected the united state to Britain, it worked for a few months but then it failed. Success was achieved in … Read the rest

Teleconferencing Then and Now

They called it “the picture phone device” up until someone decided to change the name, if it were up to me I’d still call it “picture phone”, why? Because it sounds good, back in 1960 things were very different. Look at it this way, traveling from one geographical region to another was not that difficult compared to today.

You didn’t have to go through multiple security checks or go through extreme vetting like some guy is proposing; simply put, many people did not see the need for teleconferencing or picture phone devices. Before teleconferencing became a thing foundations had to be made.  You can say that it all started with the telegraph.

The Telegraph

The Telegraph machine was invented by a mechanic named Samuel F.B Morse’s back 1840; the significance of it was it laid the groundwork needed for teleconferencing and the telecommunication industry as a whole. Its purpose was to connect people over great distances without them having to physically travel.

Soon after the telegraph, came the telephone which was invented by Graham Bell, telephones allowed people to send voice messages from one point to another with ease. In the 60s group, calls were possible through electronic central offices; the problem was it was expensive.

The game changer was fiber optics which replaced copper wire; this made teleconferencing more affordable and led to its rise in popularity.

Audio Teleconferencing

This is where it all started, audio teleconferencing is voice only. In some places it is referred to as a corporate call, back then it was used by businesses or groups to hold meetings. Although it still exists today, it still remains as one of the most underutilized methods of group communication. You can blame the high-speed internet for that.

Teleconferencing Today

Today we have the ability to communicate with whoever we want from wherever on the planet; this is thanks to the internet. There are five types of internet teleconferencing methods today, these are:

  • Internet teleconferencing:
  • Video conferencing:
  • Web conferencing
  • Augmented reality conferencing

The technology mostly used in teleconferencing is known as VOIP (voice over internet protocol) in … Read the rest